Year in Review: Celebrities Who Chose Pet Adoption in 2017

Before we say goodbye to 2017, let’s take a look back at a few of the famous faces who said “Hello!” to a new four-legged family member from an animal shelter or rescue organization…



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DogTipper

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Freba Maulauizada story is amazing and appreciatab…

Freba Maulauizada story is amazing and appreciatable
BAD RAP Blog

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Hello, 2018

Happy 2018

I just had to stop in during this (much appreciated) week off to say happy (almost) New Year! We still have a few days left, I know, but with Essley’s birthday (today!) and me heading out of town to meet Robbie in Denver for the band’s New Year run, I knew if I didn’t sent you guys my New Year’s wishes now, it wouldn’t happen. And it’s important to me to do this every year, because you are the reason Bubby and Bean exists. Truly! We are going on 7 years now (!), and the reason for that is the support of our readers. You guys made 2017 our best year ever, by far.

On a personal level, so many absolutely wonderful things have happened for us this year. Emmett’s Infantile Spasms diagnosis was dropped in April, and he spent the entire year seizure free. If he goes 8 more months without a seizure, his epilepsy diagnosis will be dropped as well. That’s major. He’s doing incredibly well, an learning so much everyday. Essley entered into (and is loving) her second year of preschool, and has been doing great in ballet, tap, gymnastics, and soccer. We traveled to Arizona and California as a family this year, and went on countless road trips through the midwest. And we finally bought our first single family home this month. We’re thrilled to be able to start 2018 in our new home.

This year was also an incredibly difficult one. We lost my stepdad Tom to lung cancer on January 28th. We miss him so much, especially right now during the holidays. It’s not easy. My stepmom was also diagnosed with ovarian cancer in June, but was (thank you universe!) told she is currently cancer free after many months of chemotherapy and major surgery. And one of my best friends of the last 22 years was diagnosed with ALS in April. I have never talked about that here, but it’s brutal. I love him with all of my heart and feel devastated that I live 2000 miles away and can’t help more. For all of you who have experienced hardships in 2017, I’m sending you love and holding you in my heart.

2016 and 2017 were not my favorite years. But I have faith in 2018. I really do. And even in the darkness, there is so much light. I try to wake up every morning with gratitude for all of the joy I have in my life. My mother in law saw something somewhere about a child who, along with her/his dad, said every morning, “I am happy, alive, and kind.” I think that is pretty much the best mantra ever, and I will be saying it myself everyday in 2018.

Whatever your plans, I hope you enjoy your New Years celebrations! I can’t wait to celebrate with my husband and hundreds of friends in Denver. See you next year, dear friends!


Top image from our holiday card collection, available here

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Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

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This is a great story! Full of great information. …

This is a great story! Full of great information. My pit bull has always been good with cats. He even snuggles with my parents cats lol. I'm glad your pitty Was able to get used to the cats. I love happy endings! Especially when pit bulls are involved! Keep spreading the good word of pit bulls!
BAD RAP Blog

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Year in Review: Fashion World to the Rescue 2017

Before we embark on a new year, let’s take a look back at some of the many supermodels, designers, fashion houses and couture-conscious canines who showed the world in 2017 that compassion is…



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DogTipper

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Ivy in the chilly December mists

Flinty cold, but the snow is gone.

IMG_6648


Natural History

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Did a dog really drop a deuce at 10 Downing Street?

The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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Friday Funny: The Cleaning Fairy

Oh, how I wish there were a cleaning fairy! Have a great weekend! Until next time, Good day, and good dog!


Doggies.com Dog Blog

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Win a YEAR of Pet-Themed Jewelry!

We’re kick off our biggest PawZaar giveaway ever! One lucky community member will win a YEAR of pet jewelry. Every quarter starting in January, the winner will receive three new pieces of…



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DogTipper

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Hunting Reeves’s Muntjac in England

Reeves’s muntjac is native to China and Taiwan. It is not native any place in Europe, but one of the places where it has been introduced is England. The epicenter of their population in that country is Bedfordshire, where this hunt takes place.  The Dukes of Bedford were into promoting deer on their estate, Woburn Abbey, and they were instrumental in saving the Pere David’s deer from extinction. One suggestion is that the muntjac in England derived from Reeves’s muntjac that escaped Woburn Abbey, but they also could have derived from escapees from the Whipsnade Zoo.

Whatever their origin, Reeves’s muntjac have established themselves a long way from their native territory, and they do quite a bit of damage to trees.

And what usually happens is that people are encouraged to hunt the invasives, but as you can see from the selective shooting that goes on this video, the species is now being managed as a sort of game species on many estates. This development should be of no surprise, and it should be noted that island of Great Britain has only two native deer species, the red and the roe. The very common fallow deer was introduced by the Romans and then again the Normans from the European continent.

But the fallow deer is essentially managed as a native game species. The exact same thing is done with Sika deer that have been introduced to Maryland. White-tailed deer are treated the same way in the Czech Republic, as are all the deer that have been introduced to New Zealand.

Whatever their treatment as a game or invasive species, this video does provide a nice closeup of the male Reeves’s muntjac as a specimen. Of particular note are the tusks, which they use for fighting and display.  It is mentioned in this clip that they are “musk deer, ” but this is in error.

This error comes from the tusks that both muntjac and musk deer possess, but musk deer are placed in their own family (Moschidae).  True deer are Cervidae, and all the muntjac species are true deer that fall into the Cervinae subfamily (which includes red deer, fallow deer, and North American elk).  However, they are primitive Cervinae.

Musk deer differ in some morphological characters from true deer in that they don’t have facial glands, possess only a single pair of teats, and have a gallbladder.  They also never have antlers, and all species possess a scent gland on their tail.

The common ancestor of musk and true deer, though, had prominent tusks. The modern muntjac species is unique in that it still has those fangs of the earliest Cervinae.

The other true deer that is known for its tusks is the Asian water deer, which was definitely introduced to Britain thanks to escapees from Woburn Abbey. But it is not closely related to the muntjac at all.

It is also not a musk deer, even though it has much more prominent tusks than the muntjac and never has antlers. Instead, it fits within Capreolinae, the subfamily of deer that includes roe deer, moose, reindeer/caribou, and all the New World deer but the wapiti. Its prominent tusks and lack of antlers are a also primitive trait in this lineage of deer.

That muntjac and water deer are both fanged shows that more primitive animals will resemble each other more the derived forms of their respective lineages.

These cnine teeth are celebrated in North America elk lore. Their “ivory” is taken as almost as much a trophy as the antlers, and indigenous people in Canada and the US used them as jewelry. They aren’t sharp daggers like those found on muntjac and water deer, though. They are just vestigial teeth that show that the ancestor of the great bugling bull were once little fanged creatures.

These upper canines also appear in white-tailed deer on occasion as an atavism.

Beyond these little fangs, North American deer lack these primitive traits, so I find fangs on these Asian species totally fascinating.

They are windows into the past, when deer were just little beasts of the undergrowth.


Natural History

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